English: A hungry baby yelling and crying.

English: A hungry baby yelling and crying. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Though my daughter is now a teen, I am still at times a member of the #zombiemom club. The reasons for the lack of sleep are now a little different but it helps me relate to the postings of the new #zoombiemoms. Their posts help me recall my experiences as a new mom. A recent Huffington post article by Melissa Sher titled “23 Things I Think New Parents Should Know” was great fun to read. (If you haven’t already done so, take a moment to check it out.)

I think I experienced a lot of these when my daughter was an infant especially: #2 (wakened by quit sounds), #11/12 (poop), #15 (we had a pup & a baby, so lots of friendly faces), and #20 (naps were way to brief).

We as new parents used lots of (#23) music with our crying infant. Much of this came from our backgrounds as a band director/composer (my husband) and a music therapist (me). It also happened with a little knowledge on our side.

Rocking and lullabies are universal. Because of their pace and the contour of the melodies, lullabies and the rocking that seems to accompany them, entrain the child and the singer/rocker to slow down.

Crying uses many elements of music. Pitch, volume, tone differ according to the type of cry. Once you get to know your child begin to learn to listen for difference that tell you : I’m hungry; I’m wet; I hurt; I’m frustrated; I’m tired. These cry tell us how to respond.

There are times we don’t know why they are crying. We just fed and changed them. We can’t find a cause for discomfort. It is those times you wish the infant could talk and tell you what’s up. With a little luck, they’ll be doing that in a few years. In the mean time, we listen test a hunch  and try what worked in the past.

Drumming was a biggy in our house. Not only had our daughter heard my heart beat. She had grown hearing my playing drums with those in senior living communities. She had heard the drum line of the marching band at the football games.  My husband loved to sing percussion cadences while patting her back during the fussy moments as we prepared her for bed at night.

Starting at her level of agitation and leading to lullabies seemed to work best for her. She needed us to help her transition her pace. (Wish it was easier to do with a teen.)

Relaxation is something we all need. Our daughter seemed to have lots of gas as an infant. I learned a few simple infant massage techniques. Both the touch and helping work the gas in her tummy while singing and interacting with her seemed to bring a relaxation response (at least some days…)

Music is a wonderful way to relate with your child. I’ve posted a lot about that which you can find here and here for starters.

Remember though muffled, your child heard the music you listen to while in utero. This music may still be familiar to them. So enjoy your music. Move to your music to help decrease your stress. Chances are your child may become aware of your decreased stress and begin to settle down. And as Melissa Sher stated “Even if the crying doesn’t stop, at least you’ll enjoy yourself.”

So, zoombiemom turn on some of your music. Sing, dance, relax for yourself. Chances are your child will respond to your state. If you relax, they are more likely to do the same. If you need music to pick up your energy after waking for several feedings during the night, chances are you’ll respond better to her child if you have something playing that brightens your mood. And, you’ll be sharing your musical preferences with your child.

What music do you play and how do you use it when you feel like a #zoombiemom?

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Tagged on:                 

14 thoughts on “Zombiemom, play your music!

    • 13 July, 2012 at 7:51 am
      Permalink

      Thank you Tirana. I’d love to know what kind of music you enjoy.

  • 13 July, 2012 at 4:26 pm
    Permalink

    JoAnn,

    Our kids have always listened to the music that we like. It is great fun to watch a four-year old singing along to “Yellow Submarine.” We’ve also encouraged family members to get musical toys, so we have lots of drums, hand instruments and other music makers around the house. Music time is good for all of us.

    Warmly,
    Ann
    Ann Becker-Schutte recently posted..Survivor’s Guilt: The Dark Side of Good NewsMy Profile

    • 13 July, 2012 at 5:04 pm
      Permalink

      Sounds like there is a rocking good time at your house. Thanks for sharing, Ann.

  • 13 July, 2012 at 6:44 pm
    Permalink

    JoAnn.
    Great suggestions. I recently had the opportunity to participate in an interactive drumming demonstration by a therapist and how he uses this activity with children. Lots of fun.

    Arlene

    • 14 July, 2012 at 7:41 am
      Permalink

      Drumming can be a great way to interact no matter our age. They are easy to use and seem to bring out a playfulness in people. Even when you are alone and play or sing, it can be a wonderful release of emotions and tensions.

  • 14 July, 2012 at 1:40 pm
    Permalink

    Hi JoAnn,

    Music is so important for all of us to keep our sanity; even more so for new moms! And once they’re a little older, making music with kids is so much fun, you can’t help but feel better.

    P.S. Love your captcha! I need to add this to my site!
    Lynda Buitrago recently posted..Feed Me Friday: What’s in Your EVOO?My Profile

    • 16 July, 2012 at 3:28 pm
      Permalink

      Making music is fun!

  • 16 July, 2012 at 12:55 pm
    Permalink

    Music is definitely an important part of day-to-day life in our house. Most recently, singing in the car helps my little one deal with the fact she doesn’t want to be in her car seat. Plus, I can sing even as a #zombiemom.
    Rachelle Norman recently posted..Forgiving ForgetfulnessMy Profile

    • 16 July, 2012 at 3:29 pm
      Permalink

      What is your and your little one’s favorite song for the car, #zombiemom?

    • 18 July, 2012 at 3:02 pm
      Permalink

      Dancing can add an element of fun to cleaning.

  • 23 July, 2012 at 4:05 pm
    Permalink

    Hi JoAnn,
    Great post. Music does soothe the savage beast (or something like that) in most of us. I remember when our son was giving up his nap, we could sometimes get him to drift off by playing Magical Mystery Tour. We were pleased and amused.
    Music still is calming to me.
    Best,
    Carolyn
    Carolyn Stone recently posted..Your Children and the Aftermath of the Colorado ShootingsMy Profile

    • 24 July, 2012 at 9:56 am
      Permalink

      Guess he needed a little musical encouragement to take a tour of naps? Love that that was the song of choice.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: